Updated Summary of Trailer and Truck Purchase Decisions.

Karen and I started touring RVs in January 2015 with a visit to the local RV show. In time, I came up with an outline of seven steps we might consider leading to the eventual purchase. As usual my personality provokes me into over-thinking every aspect of the decision. It has been a fun process as I enjoy research and meeting others who have gone through the process of selecting their rig. Karen and I agree with the concept of buying your third trailer first. In other words, whatever we get we are planning to keep for a long time and avoid taking a hit on depreciation should we trade out the trailer within a couple of years. I have read several times where others estimate trailers depreciate quickly in the first five years.

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Final Truck Research

Five weeks ago, I posted an article regarding my initial truck research. Because of the trailer weights we are considering, our truck will be a one ton dually. A second article was posted a couple weeks later.  Readers passed along the pin weights of their fifth wheel trailers were running between 19 and 21% of their total trailer weight. That’s also consistent with what others are reporting in forums. The pin is the front of the trailer that rides on the truck’s rear tires and is a reason we are going with a one ton dually.

I found all three manufacturers can handle the weights we are interested in. I researched the 2016 and 2017 truck models. Base prices on their least expensive trucks were within $720 of each other. The manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) for 18 new truck builds, with the options I was initially interested in, varied as much as $18,435. And of those new trucks, 12 were over our budget.  In a roundabout way, it helped to further narrow the list with our decision that we wanting leather interior. None of the new truck models were within our budget with leather interior. The decision then became what used trucks we could afford that had the options we were interested in.  There were huge changes from 2016 to 2017 in Ford heavy duty trucks. The Ram was unchanged between those years and there were a few changes in the Chevy/GMC. It took some time but I was able to locate used trucks with most of the options we are interested in.

Research showed an average discount of 22.24% off the new MSRP for trucks if bought one year old. And those are compared with ones located on dealers’ lots at their asking prices. Many had mileage of less than 10,000. Several were even at local dealerships.

2017 Used Truck Prices_LI

All things considered and for what are my preferences, the Ford F350 Lariat and Ram Laramie 3500 were the two trucks I am most interested in. As a side note, I was surprised to find the Ram is the only one of the four brands that’s available in 2017 with factory air suspension.

Another point I want to make is about brand loyalty. I get it. The last three trucks I’ve purchased were Fords. On several occasions folks have suggested they wished they could buy one companies engine paired with another’s transmission. ALL four manufactures have the same powertrain warranty. So, if they think their truck has a better setup then why not show it in the warranty? Personally, I’m hoping that having a couple trucks in mind to purchase will at least double the chances of finding a fair deal.

2017 Truck Warranty

We should purchase our truck next year and will most likely trade-in one family car at the time. Most likely we will keep Karen’s car to be sold sometime before we leave in 2019 on our future in an RV. We are discussing selling it earlier if she is comfortable driving the larger truck. I posted about going to one family car.

Because I’ll have at least three specific trailers selected and know their critical weights, I have no problem buying the truck first.

I put together a spreadsheet on the topic.  Sorry, I only knew how to post the spreadsheet link as a PDF. If you have trouble loading the spreadsheet and want a copy send me an email at mseneker@hotmail.com. I’m happy to send it.

Truck Comparisons PDF  (click here to see the spreadsheet). The nuts and bolts of the research is outlined in the spreadsheet which was easier than repeating it all within this blog post.

Here are a few internet links of more interest than others:

  • From the Big Truck Big RV YouTube site: 2017 truck of the year opinion. He owns a 2016 Ford and selected the 2017 Ram. Here is the link. He adds all three manufacturers can handle a 20,000 pound fifth wheel and believed no engine/transmission is better than another.
  • Roads Less Traveled blog has several postings regarding their 2016 truck upgrade. They test drove all of them!
  • Side by Side Video: 2017 one tons by MrTruckTV and another guy I’ve seen in a lot of videos. Towing around 22,000 pounds. Pin weight in this test is at 19% or over 4,180 pounds. Max tow for the Chevy is 23,000 pounds so they had to limit in order to compare. Chevy won the race with Ram coming in second place.

If you find any details in this post to be incorrect, please let me know. I’m no expert and don’t want to put out any bad information.

After writing this blog post I’ve kept looking at truck adds each day. I’m finding some wonderful trucks around the 20,000 mile mark. Found a 2015 Ram 3500 Laramie Longhorn Limited Edition for an asking price of $51,700 at a local dealership. And a loaded 2016 Ford F350 Lariat with less than 10,000 miles at another local dealership listed at $55,000. There are newer dually Ram Tradesmen Editions out there in the mid 40’s in great condition.

Additional Health Care Planning

This will be the last of three blog posts concerning health care. I just completed truck research and will get that posted soon.  I’ve come up with a short list of trucks I’m interested in as well as an idea of how we intend to purchase one and when. 

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On the home front, Karen now has an
Instant Pot and loves it.  Three people at work also bought one and we all plan to share recipes. Karen made the best spaghetti she has ever made, browning the meat, putting in the sauce and noodles without dirtying any other dishes. And the chicken wings she cooked up were as good as any restaurant. 

 

Now on to health care.  I want to mention a few notes about legislature that’s in the works as well as a seldom known way to fund a Health Savings Account if you have a high deductible health insurance plan.

In an earlier post I mentioned how a co-worker uses a doctor who does not except insurance. His doctor is following this blog. On Dr. Rigg’s website there is a link to the Primary Care Enhancement Act of 2017 as well as a host of information concerning health care reform.

Per congress.gov  “this bill will permit an individual to pay primary care service arrangement costs from a health savings account; and allow an eligible taxpayer enrolled in a high-deductible health plan to take a tax deduction for cash paid into a health savings account, even if the taxpayer is simultaneously enrolled in a primary care service arrangement. Under a primary care service arrangement, an individual is provided coverage restricted to primary care services in exchange for a fixed periodic fee or payment for such services. For the purposes of certain tax-deductible expenses for medical care, the bill expands the definition of “medical care” to include periodic provider fees, including: (1) periodic fees paid to a primary care physician for a defined set of medical services or the right to receive medical services on an as-needed basis; and (2) pre-paid primary care services designed to screen for, diagnose, cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent disease and promote wellness.”

If I understand it correctly, this would allow an individual to pay a monthly fee to their doctor who provides primary care services for basic medical needs. And one could make the payments from a tax-exempt Health Savings Account (HSA) which might be a reason it is contested. In other words, this would become a form of health insurance whereby the darn insurance company (and their profits) are taken out of the equation.

Regarding funding a Health Savings Account (HSA): Karen and I are doing this through a plan at work whereby my employer also contributes money. At retirement, I hope to have built the account up. I’ll turn 55 years of age next year and will take advantage of the catch-up rule where I can contribute an additional $1,000 on top of the maximum allowed for a family. I just found out the law allows a once in a lifetime contribution to an HSA from an IRA.  I think this one-time transfer would be rarely used but might be a way to fund an HSA if one does not have the cash during a given year to make a contribution to an HSA. Here are my notes:

One time transfer of IRA money to a HSA account. The once-in-a-lifetime transfer from an IRA to an HSA does not increase the maximum you can transfer is your normal HSA contribution limit. In other words it’s not on top of your normal contribution limit. If you do the transfer, it reduces dollar-for-dollar the amount you can contribute in other ways, either directly or through your employer. The transfer from your IRA to your HSA is not taxable, but you also lose the tax deduction you otherwise would get if you contribute normally. If you do the transfer you must also commit to staying with an HSA-eligible high deductible health plan for 12 months. If you fail the commitment, the transfer becomes taxable and you’d have to pay a 10% penalty. The benefit is that the transferred funds and all earnings thereon could eventually come out tax-free, provided they are used for medical expenses. A qualified transfer from an IRA to HSA once you are on Medicare is not allowed.

  • As a side note, government rules allow an investor to distribute IRA funds to pay for medical expenses. The 10% early distribution penalty may be avoided if proceeds are distribution prior to 59½. So you don’t need to move money from an IRA to an HSA to use it for medical expense. However there are special rules such as if you spend out of the IRA that years medical expenses must be at least 10% of your adjusted gross income.
  • For 2017 the IRS defined “high deductible” as any deductible higher than $1,300 for an individual or $2,600 for a family, so your health insurance plan has to meet that threshold for you to qualfy for an HSA.
  • My HSA has investment options so I would not be losing what the IRA savings would have earned through investment. 

Do your own homework before you decide to transfer money to an HSA from an IRA.

new flash Here is an interesting web site: Travel Tax.com – from Camper Cornicles blog.

Health Care Research – Direct Medical Care

Just a quick follow up to my last post regarding health care planning. I had mentioned a coworker uses his health savings account (HSA) to pay for medical care with his family of four. His doctor charges a set fee which is believed to be about what an insurance company would have paid the doctor or less.  I met with him briefly for more details.

The doctor’s web page is directmedicalcare.net.  There are two levels of payment depending if your family is a “member” or not. An annual fee is $800 for a couple or $1,200 for a family. Basic doctor’s visits, annual physicals and more are free for members. For non-members a doctor’s visit is $70 for example. And the doctor offers on-line medical care they call “virtual care” at $50 during office hours or $60 after hours. Also, the doctor will met him at the office after hours for care such as if he need stiches at a cost generally lower than an urgent care facility.

I asked my co-worker when he might use his insurance coverage and he said only for major medical issues such as for hospitalizations or referral to a specialist. Under the direct medical care service the doctor’s office does not file insurance claims. You must do that on your own, however the doctor’s office will provide you with the appropriate codes to submit to the insurance company.  I also asked how this affects meeting his annual insurance deductible. He has a high deductible plan and does not worry about it because he does not ever meet the deductible unless his family has a major-medical issue. I’d want to check with the insurance company to see if I could maintain records to show how much I had spent out of pocket or how they are handling services from doctors who except cash payment. Luckily, Karen knows how to file accurate insurance claims.

I could see doing more research in finding a doctor who does not take insurance but charges a lower fee such as this. Perhaps we might find a service in whatever state we decide to domicile in or spend our winters. Then have all the records sent to the new doctor. Or another option might be to switch to a doctor who is near our current home where we intend to later visit family for longer periods. I really am interested in the “virtual visit” portion of the plan. Not only would we not have to subscribe to another service while on the road but our established doctor would have a better idea of our issues before we hit the road, such as the need for prescription medications and more.

I wonder if having an established doctor in the state we select as a domicile will make a difference in establishing a “legal” domicile or not?

This is the first I have ever heard of such as service.  Once I started surfing the internet I found it to be more common than expected. Click on the link for direct medical care and have a look.

Health Care Planning

Thought I would post a few notes about our planning for health care costs.  I also want to say thank you to all the new readers who have signed up to follow this blog lately. It’s good to have you and your ideas so feel free to comment even within the older posts.

Like so many others, I follow Nina’s blog over at Wheelingit. Nina does an amazing job of summarizing current health care options so I’ll leave that to her. We all await future attempts by the US Congress at passing new health care laws. I don’t intend to make political statement so I’ll leave that alone other than to say it does seem reasonable the actual costs associated with health care services must be addressed to get at one root of the problem.  For now, I suppose we must take matters into our own hands based on whatever is available at the time.  So, to that end, I’ll post what I’ve been planning.

Karen and my situation factor in a few “what-ifs” although I don’t like using that phrase when problem solving.

  • We plan to move to fulltime RV living when I’m 56 years old. Karen will be a year from Medicare eligibility. She spent most of her career in medical billing which included helping folks out at hospice to figure out insurance options. I’m lucky to have her around to bounce ideas off.  She also has firsthand experience regarding how health care insurance companies handle claims.
  • Without re-entering the workforce later with health care benefits, I’ll be paying for my own for a good nine years. Our budget will have to include a plan with both of us for the first year. After that there could be supplemental Medicare insurance for Karen. Regarding this, Karen says we have to look at her options in terms of do I keep her on my insurance as a secondary insurance rather than having a supplemental Medicare policy. We will look at that in 2020 when the time arrives.
  • She agrees and I’ve experienced in the past that using COBRA after I leave fulltime employment is about the most expensive option out there. I met with our Human Resources person at work and confirmed its way expensive, even if I’m the only one on the plan. I would have 90 days after leaving a job to decide to file for COBRA which is good for 18 months.
  • In related topics, I’ve done very little research regarding long-term care insurance other than knowing neither of us want the other to ever be in a nursing home. I add this only because it’s health care related and a budget consideration.  Life insurance is in the same category.  At the advice of an experienced friend, I’m to look at the cost difference between taking a reduced pension with survivor benefits verses the cost of life insurance should we decide we even need it.
  • Karen added if she ever had to go in a nursing home she would file for Medicaid and make use of spousal protection clauses to separate our income and assets. She said she would not worry much about only being left with $80 a month from her social security check because she would not live long in a nursing home.
  • All this has to fit in an annual income budgeted at $3,375 a month after taxes and including inflation in 2019 when I plan to leave my job. If you’re interested there is a good thread at the Escapees forum regarding fulltime RV budgets beginning November 2015.
  • I’m always on the hunt for new ways to tax defer income as we have very few deductions to take on our annual taxes.

So here is what I’m thinking and doing today for us. Subject to change…

  • I added a Health Savings Account (HSA) plan at work. We use this to pay for our portion of medical expenses. After reaching a certain balance, the extra can be invested. I contribute the maximum amount allowed by the current tax law which is $6,750 annually. I turn 55 during 2018 when I’ll take advantage of the catch-up clause which allows us to add another $1,000 annually. At work, I enrolled in a high deductible health care insurance plan with Blue Cross and Blue Shield. My employer also contributes an amount to our HSA account as part of the annual $6,750 limit and our account is growing quickly. For those that don’t know, an HSA is not the insurance portion, it’s a savings account with a debit card used to pay for certain health care expense. Among other things, an HSA account cannot be used to pay for our current monthly health insurance premium. The money for the HSA account is deducted from my paycheck before taxes. And I’m not taxed on the money when spent! There were several points to consider before we decided to change our health care plan at work.  You must consider your own health situation before doing this.
  • I’m planning to use the established HSA balance to pay for out of pocket health expenses once we hit the road. If Congress votes in an increase on the maximum contribution limit, I’ll take advantage of it at least until I retire. Then after I’ll most likely come up with a minimum amount I want to keep in the HSA account based on our health care insurance plans maximum out of pocket expenses.
  • More than likely, based on today’s health care insurance availability, I’ll be going with a higher deductible plan at retirement. Some refer to this as a catastrophic plan so you don’t go broke if major medical issues arrive. Again, that’s a what if which includes Karen and I not having any huge medical issues when I retire.
  • Months ago, we joined our local community fitness center which costs $50 a month for the two of us. This included three sessions with a fitness trainer. Living a healthy lifestyle is for sure a way to reduce health care costs. Our family genetics for health issues prior to age 65 are not that bad – but then again that’s a “what if.”
  • I figure we will go to Mexico for eye care and dental. I’m still thinking about how to handle prescription drug cost but will certainly follow the law with whatever option we come up with. OR – research how to cut the cost of this and other health care services. Here enters the notion of finding the best care at the least cost. I found a good article here that was written in 2011 as a starting point. I have zero experience shopping around for affordable health care services. Suppose now that payment is coming out of my HSA account that’s about to change. So far, I’ve found two resources of interest which are mdsave.com and healthcarebluebook.com.
  • Karen had a few comments regarding how insurance is billed. You are at the mercy of the doctor’s billing person. Sometimes they code procedures, treatments and facility fees incorrectly. She says to challenge the costs and file an appeal with the insurance company. You might even be able to talk the doctor’s billing person into refiling the claim if they agree the insurance company (or the billing person) made an error. If you don’t believe the insurance was billed correctly you can also go directly to the insurance company to discuss the issue. Of course this is presuming one is able to recognize the error or what appears to be an out of control price from the doctor’s office (see the above online resources). She added an example where the doctor’s office, who are in-network, can only be paid per the contract with the insurance company. It’s typical that Blue Cross will only pay 49% of the total billed to them by the doctor in our region for example. She says the key is if you are paying the cost out of pocket then negotiate a price which is equal to what the insurance company would have paid.
  • A coworker told me his doctor knows he is paying fees out of pocket through his HSA account. He has a family of four. The doctor’s billing is setup to charge him fees that are lower, presumably closer to the rate an insurance company would have paid. He does not have to negotiate the fees at all. Nor does he get a bill later from the doctor’s office because the insurance claim was denied or not paid in full by the insurance company. I’m hoping more doctors will take this approach and I can find a good one out of the group.
  • I’m also very much interested in speaking with doctors through online video services for the more basic needs. Although I’m concerned something like a chronic cough might become something worse, for example, if we don’t meet in person.  I suppose any qualified doctor or nurse online would know enough to refer us to proper medical care?
  • Briefly, regarding what state and county we intend to take up residency (domicile). We all know health care insurance cost, availability and plan coverage will factor in. And of course that will be one of the considerations as to where we officially call our home.

I know enough about the topic to be dangerous. I’m trying not to put out any bad information and really appreciate your ideas, corrections and additions. PS – I don’t qualify for veterans benefits as I did not have enough combined active service when I was in the National Guard.

Truck Research and Snow in KC

Just when you think winter might have shown its face for the last time it snows in Kansas City.  Fortunately, it was beautiful to look at and gone later in the afternoon as the temperature went up.  I’m hoping our plumb trees bear fruit because they have already bloomed and there are a couple freezing nights ahead of us. The boys find a place to hang out when it’s bad outside.

Ringo found a pile of sheets to sleep on because Huck already took up a position on the dog bed.  We also have two cats.

Sylvester appears in the above photo in a typical position after he eats. Sylvester prefers moderate weather and often stays inside when its bad outside. We don’t plan to travel with all these animals in the future. The dogs are getting older so we will have to see who is with us in a couple years.  Sylvester came home with Karen from the veterinarian’s office as an adoption (two years ago). She is looking for a new home for Sylvester which I hope goes well. The dogs love to travel but the cats are used to roaming the acreage outside which is not going to work in an RV.

I spent time inside as well. Finally gathered up all the canning jars, pressure cooker and such to post on Craigslist.  I’m trying to sell off items in larger groups. Next might be the motorcycle, helmets and bike pack. The end of my vegetable growing hobby reminded me of my Uncle Don at about my own age. As I recall, we were standing in his backyard near the base of the stairs leading from his deck and noticed his garden plot was not planted. Don said he stopped planting because it was too much work.  I am like him in a lot of ways. His garden included a watering system therefore so did mine.  Life is a heck of a lot shorter when you think about others who have passed and what they were up to at your own age. No doubt Uncle Don figured out everything he wanted to know about gardening so he moved on to something else. That’s a family trait.

I’ve been hacking away at truck research, adding a new section on the blog to keep my notes. You can find the truck page here.  I stayed up late one night building trucks online to get the base prices. I know what our budget is and am working on finding out the price points each of these monsters come in at. That way it might narrow the search to a model or two from each truck manufacturer that is in line with our budget. These diesel suckers are expensive. I can remember when $10,000 would buy a new Cadillac.

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The starting prices shown include necessary options such as fifth wheel hitch preparation, on-the-fly electronic 4×4, minimum of cloth interior and running boards. The prices include rebates or incentives as of today at the manufacturers suggested retail price (MSRP).

It’s interesting to note additional options sometimes come in a package when selected. Such as Chevy/GMC requires you get a spray in bed liner if you select the fifth wheel hitch preparation.  I also found the base price between all the trucks are within about $500 to $720 of one another. Not much of a price difference to be concerned about.

I’m in the process of learning about what options influence the trucks weight capabilities. Hopefully learning what others mean by a “properly equipped truck can handle” a specific fifth wheel weight.  And along the lines of weight. There are a ton of places to consider such as gross cargo weight and rear axle weight where the front of the camper rides over the truck.  There are assumptions that might factor in such as what is the average cargo weight stored in the front of a fifth wheel. And people are posting in forums you can’t always trust the fifth wheel manufactures posted weights. Some are suggesting pin weight is 10 to 20% (update, a couple readers said their pin weight loaded is 19 and 21%) of the total fifth wheel weight. But then again cargo loaded in the rear of the fifth wheel will offset some of the weight in the front when it pushes down on the rear of the camper, like a teeter totter.  So much to learn. I may be sick in the head but I’m enjoying the research.  Those guys over on the truck forums really are proud of their trucks!  Someday I hope to know enough to ask intelligent questions. Give it a try. Go online and build a truck. Watch how the weight capacity changes when you select gear ratio, 4×4 and engine.

Once I get the spreadsheet done I may post a link to it so folks can look it over.  I’m off to start learning about all the optional equipment so I can build one of each truck online and get closer to the actual MSRP with the options we are interested in. What’s cool about building the truck online are the links to similar equipped trucks for sale in the area.

 

new flash  Here is an informative blog post by Hebard’s Travels titled How to Travel with Cats in an RV

Started Truck Research

I suspect this will be the first of several blog posts I write concerning truck research. I’m hoping to get advice from those more knowledgeable.

Karen and I decided on a fifth wheel because we plan to be parked for longer periods of time while workamping or volunteering. And of course, we will be living in it fulltime. If we were going to move around most of the time we would go with a Class A. We have also decided to start off with a one ton dually truck because of the stability it offers when towing as well as the increased pin weight capabilities. We know this truck might not be the best option for a daily driver but are going to try and live with it. Pulling a car behind a Class A might be the best option for a daily driver or even her driving a second vehicle might work. We prefer to travel together rather than driving separately. Personally, I would not own a pickup truck without four-wheel drive because trucks just don’t have great traction in bad weather without it. My past three trucks have been gas F150 Fords with four-wheel drive.

After touring fifth wheel floor plans we find ourselves attracted to trailers weighing in the ranges of 16,000 to 19,000 gross pounds given their construction, cargo capacity, amenities and our budget should we buy new. Pin weights, or the part that rides over the rear axle of the truck, vary by sometimes large margins. And it is this pin weight that steers us to the dual rear wheel trucks. We are attempting to buy a fifth wheel that we will not want to trade out of sooner than later.  However, if we do we want the option of having a heavier trailer without switching out the truck.

I’ve not come to a definite conclusion but could see picking out maybe three trailers we are interested in for our short list. As we would know the trailer weights I feel safe in buying the truck a little earlier. In the forums, most are recommending ordering the trailer first. I don’t see the difference in buying the trailer first or having three specific trailers we’ve selected to choose from before the truck is purchased, especially as we are looking at well-equipped dually trucks.

To me the advantages of having the truck first is we plan to pay cash for the truck, trading in at least one of our existing vehicles. The trailer will be financed, at least in part, until we sell our home.  We would have the truck to help move our household belongings when sold, to storage, given away or trashed.  Although a lesser concern, we would also have a period of time to get used to driving the larger truck before we hookup a 35 to 40-foot trailer to it. Most of all, if we find the trailer we want parked on a lot for sale, we would be able to purchase it on the spot. Rather than waiting for our truck to be built at the factory or hoping to find a used or new one ton truck for sale at a fair price and locally.  Certainly, we all have read where others had no problem purchasing the truck and trailer at the same time however. And some already owned a good truck and found a trailer it would tow.

The truck research so far has been easier than researching the trailer. I’ve met a few people online who are truck experts and can count on their help. It appears any of the big three truck builders have trucks that can handle the weight we are looking at so the field to search from is far smaller than it was for fifth wheels.

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Standard extra leaf spring in dually F350, you can order the same in an F250

An extra two rear tires is not all one gets with a dual wheel one ton truck.

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Dual real trucks have larger axles and other components

I’ve been stopping by dealerships and picking up their 2017 truck brochures. So far, I’m just trying to get my head wrapped around what options each truck offers and what all the terminology means such as gear ratios, gross cargo or combined weight, and more. And what amenities are standard or can be an option in which models. The words “properly equipped truck” has a lot of meaning in that adding certain options can significantly add to the trucks towing capacity. Real important if we plan to buy a truck with greater towing capacity than we might currently need.

And then there are decisions to be made such as what margin of safety is best to build into the truck such as X percent more cargo weight capacity above what we are routinely hauling.

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This F350 dual rear wheel truck has lower bed sides than the F250

I’ve run into several other concerns, some more minor, which will require a decision. Such as are the truck bed sides tall and leave very little room between the top of the truck sides and bottom of the fifth wheel which could cause damage when you go over large pumps on the road. We have already decided on a long-bed truck so there will be no concern when turning the trailer that it might strike the rear cab of the truck if a slider hitch is not used. I can see having an axillary fuel tank/tool box combination in the truck someday so a long-bed would be important for that as well. And what about color? Do we go with white and put stripes on it later or add a second paint color to match the fifth wheel or what?  I’m hoping by selecting three potential fifth wheels we might buy we can just pick out a color that looks okay with all three. Then again, I’ve never worried much about vehicle colors. Keeping options open with color in the past has allowed me to find better deals because of the larger selection compared to wanting any one color. Not a deal breaker for sure.

The trucks I’ve owned have been one year old when purchased at a substantial discount. I like to buy vehicles with around 20,000 miles on them and still in warranty. I’m finding these dually one-ton trucks hold their value at that low mileage so am certainly considering purchasing a new one as well. A local dealership has always been good about finding a used truck for me at a fair price markup. I’d hope he would do the same with a new one. I’m not brand loyal to any one manufacturer but have the most experience with Fords. So, I started researching what’s important in a truck hauling heavy weights with the Fords, hoping what I learn will be applicable in the Dodge and Chevy. We will most likely purchase a model between the years 2017 and 2019. It should not be hard to find out the differences between the years.

If your interesting – Here is a Link to my truck shopping and research page where I’m parking notes.

 

new flash Forest River revises it warranty parts policy, telling dealers to get the part using the most expedient delivery method. They will cover the increased cost. The hope is to shorten the wait to have RVs repaired.