Coffee Anyone?

Let’s take a moment to discuss a most important topic – coffee…

I’ve been looking over our arsenal of products we use to make the “perfect” cup of coffee.  It’s no trivial event here on the Seneker ponderosa. We switched over to the Keurig system years ago and figured out a way to make my own single serve cups. Not just because of the price of the coffee pods, but to allow use of our own selection of coffee. 

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Look at our bottom freezer drawer, full of different coffee brands if you think I’m not serious about the topic.

 

 

I believe I’ve found the perfect method to make my own K Cups.  I’ll get to that in a moment. But first, here is a look at the experiments that lead to my current method.

Foil lids

Started out purchasing boxes of full K Cups and recycling them. Dumping out the old coffee grounds and washing out the cup and filter. Then using foil discs that are ironed onto the old plastic cups once filled with whatever coffee brand we were drinking at the time. If I had a stack of recycled cups I could iron on 30 lids in five minutes. And not even ruin Karen’s clothing iron doing it!

Then decided to skip the iron trick and just buy thin plastic lids that snap on recycled cups.  I get about three reuses of each lid. But added another step which was washing the lids along with a second recycling of used cups. Spraying water all over the area around the sink.

 

And finally, drifting to my current system for making our own K Cups. I purchased these reusable plastic mesh cups. And small filters to go along with them. You can place coffee directly in the cups without filters. However using the filters makes cleanup as easy as pulling the used filter/coffee and replacing it.

 

Now for the next decision. Knowing space is limited in our future RV home, what do we keep making coffee with? 

Figure we will keep the Keurig and maybe add something to use over an outside burner  when we don’t have electrical service. I assume if you have installed an inverter in your rig you can run a coffee maker off batteries when not on electrical hookup? 

Coffee Pot inside

 

I’m trying not to purchase anything new and just go on the road with what we have. But I may just scrap it all and purchase an electric pot with a metal carafe that holds heat all day.

And maybe use our existing single burner gas stove and buy a stainless pot for outside usage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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19 thoughts on “Coffee Anyone?

  1. We use a typical drip coffee pot when on electric. When not, we can run it on our inverter like you said. We also have a Thermos brand carafe and when not on electric, put the freshly brewed coffee into it and no kidding, it will stay hot ALL day. We also have a Coleman propane that sits on the inside or outside stove. It just takes longer. We buy our own beans and grind them.

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  2. Mark has made his obsession with coffee sound simple. Here is my take.
    We have spent hours running around town searching for the coffee of the moment. He spends hours online searching out different coffees. He informs me of every new change he makes to his search and technique.
    In addition to the freezer drawer, he has commandeered a large three shelf cupboard and a smaller three shelf cupboard. The larger cupboard holds his supplies, and my iron. The smaller cupboard, the finished pods.
    When I am cooking he inevitably decides to “make” his coffee pods. I have learned over the years to turn off the stove and exit the kitchen.
    Out comes the utensils, the coffee (several kinds), the dirty pods, the clean pods, the lids, the bean grinder and my iron.
    First, he cleans the pods, usually happily splashing water everywhere and spreading wet grounds all around the trash can, the sink and his work space (the whole kitchen).
    He pulls the current hand towel, bunches it up and puts the saved pods and lids on it to dry. I put these away into the Tupperware bowls that I have given him when he is finished with his task (he used to put them in neat piles that spilled out when the cupboard was opened).
    Now he is ready to make “new” old pods. Again grounds end up everywhere, including the freezer. He makes caffeinated coffee, half decaffeinated and completely decaffeinated. He makes flavored caffeinated, half decaffeinated and completely decaffeinated pods. He lines them in neat rows in the smaller cupboard.
    Lastly, Mark stands back satisfied with his work, waiting for acknowledgement and positive feedback.
    Oh, did I mention the large bowl next to the coffeemaker to hold used pods? Or that I am on my third iron?
    I miss the days when coffee meant a 12 cup pot, steaming, waiting for multiple cups at once to serve to guests at the same time or for us during the day, and used grounds for use in the garden.
    I believe this is a better picture of the coffee process.
    As to the RV coffee, hobo coffee suits me just fine.

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  3. LOL….not sure what you’re going to do on the road…shall be interesting to watch. I don’t drink coffee and Dave thankfully drinks his morning coffee then that’s it for the day. We use a good old fashioned electric Black & Decker.

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  4. LOL! This is too funny. You do know Keurig makes a coffee filter K-cup where you can put your own grounds in, right? We used that for quite awhile, but it does get cumbersome (coffee grounds in the gray tank can’t be good either, no matter how well you clean the coffee filter). We finally decided on the Breville grindmaster machine (coffee is VERY important to us, too)–it automatically grinds the amount of beans programmed to the intensity of brew and amount of coffee needed. It heats the water to the right degrees (it’s the water heat that makes the difference) and brews the coffee into a heat-holding pot. We brew 10-12 cups and it fills both of our Yeti cups (mine is an Artic, though) to almost the top. I just brew another pot if we need more, but usually that’s enough (30 ounces). The Breville does take some counter space (a sacrifice worth it to us) and is fussy in that it needs cleaned once a week so everything runs smoothly, but we’ve decided we like it more than our Keurig coffee and we can pick whatever beans we want (we order the black magic beans from keurig still because I have so many rewards points from Keurig.com from when we were ordering pods–they offer okay discounts, but we like the coffee). I also have a French press that I use when I want my New Orleans coffee (I like the chickory) or a cup of tea–it’s cheap and easy and makes wonderful coffee, too–just doesn’t stay as hot as long. Either way–sounds as if you are as picky about your coffee as we are, so I hope you find what works for you! Dawn

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  5. You know our solar system and the short answer to your question about can you make coffee without being hooked up to electric – we do it all the time! We have a very cheap Mr Coffee coffee pot. When boondocking, we put the coffee in a thermos to keep it hot so we can turn off the burner, unless there is plenty of sun, then we may leave it on.

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    • Good to know Kelly. Sounds like you have the simplest system. I keep eyeballing the insulated stainless steel carafes that come with some drip coffee machines thinking it would be less glass to haul around. I know one thing for sure, if we get another coffee maker it will have no damn clock that has to be reset all the time.

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  6. Too funny! Have you thought of getting a toy hauler to store your coffee supplies? 😉

    We have a single cup coffeemaker that is K-cup compatible. We use the metal filter without paper, which works great. We also use an aluminum percolator when we are boondocking, which works very well.

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  7. Since my husband and I favor State and National Park campgrounds, we’re usually without hookups so we rely on a stovetop coffee pot. Actually, we have two – a beloved Revereware pot that belonged to my Mom and a new stainless steel pot from Cabela’s. One usually stays home while the other travels with us. We love the flavor we get from percolating and the fact that the final product is always steaming hot. Enjoying a great cup of coffee is always an important part of our camping experience!

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  8. We use a Keurig even when boondocking. Our trailer is small, so we are limited on how much coffee we can carry. I will be looking for your follow up once you have been on the road for awhile.

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  9. Hmmmm…..what space in the RV is Karen giving you for the coffee; or should I ask what you are leaving behind to include it? Lol! We let our Keurig go and I’m now regretting it, until a friend told me about a new coffee maker that provides the option of a pot of coffee or using Keurig cups. That would suit us best and at some point it will replace our current coffeemaker. I love coffee but am not the coffee aficionado that you are; however, I’m sure I would appreciate your knowledge and time spent on your coffee addiction, if I ever benefited from the effort you put in to it. The things that are important, right? Lol!

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